Methodology of Establishing National Monitoring Information Systems

Peter Pembleton

Abstract

The thesis presents a methodology that examines a wide range of issues that should be addressed when preparing for and managing a national monitoring information system. The methodology presents nine steps dealing primarily with procedural concerns that surround the development, operation and maintenance of computerized applications: defining the problem; proposing a target solution; conceptualizing the situation; managing and using the data; managing the users; developing the system; managing the resources; management tools; and determining the factors of success. The first step (defining the problem), is concerned with the users—the stakeholders and counterparts of the ‘system’—and examines ‘why’ the system is being established. The section considers that social and diplomatic skills will be the main tools needed, as there will almost certainly be multiple stakeholders to the system. The second step (proposing a target solution) briefly reviews types of system models that will be needed to undertake a preliminary examination of issues of ‘what’ and ‘who’: this step requires an iterative process with the stakeholders. In step three (conceptualizing the situation), systems analysis techniques are considered in more detail, this time supporting an examination of the emerging system. Here the need for establishing ‘system boundaries’ is important, i.e. what should be computerized and what are the other system components. While there is plenty of literature on systems analysis, these sections do not go into much detail. The next step (managing and using the data) is the critical component of any system. Here an overview of an example monitoring information system (for the environment) is presented, showing the main components from data collection, through processing to end use: the initiation of measures to redress problems identified through the system. Consideration is given to means of collection, storage, access and dissemination and some space is devoted to considering what the data could be used for, as well as its interpretation and analysis. Step 5 (managing the users) returns to the beneficiaries of the system. The multiple stakeholders to a monitoring information system and the need for coordination of different parts of the system are considered. Step 6 (developing the system) briefly looks at the preparation of system specifications, prototyping and application development. Step 7 (managing the resources) returns to another key topic, namely managing the resources that will be needed to run an information system, especially the human resources/skills and the financial resources. Management of the system is also the topic of step 8 (management tools), in this case briefly looking at tools for project management, monitoring and analysis. Step 9 (determining the factors of success) wraps up the methodology by presenting some thoughts and questions that may be useful when reviewing the success or failure of the information system. The contextual setting for the methodology is the growing body of literature on our ‘knowledge-based’ and networked society for which monitoring of social and environmental phenomena is of increasing importance. The methodology was tested in fieldwork undertaken primarily in China with some additional inputs from related studies for Mauritius, the Philippines and Thailand. The results of these studies are contained in the ‘case study’ and Annexes of the thesis.
Diploma typeDoctor of Philosophy
Author Peter Pembleton - Instytut Informacji Naukowej i Studiów Biblilogicznych (IINSB WHUW) [Faculty of History (WH UW)]
Peter Pembleton,,
-
Title in EnglishMethodology of Establishing National Monitoring Information Systems
Languageen angielski
Certifying University/Institution (when outside WUT)Faculty of History (WH UW)
Disciplinelibrary and information science / (humanities) / (humanities)
Defense Date13-06-2001
End date27-06-2001
Supervisor Mieczysław Muraszkiewicz (FEIT / IN)
Mieczysław Muraszkiewicz,,
- The Institute of Computer Science

Keywords in English-
Abstract in EnglishThe thesis presents a methodology that examines a wide range of issues that should be addressed when preparing for and managing a national monitoring information system. The methodology presents nine steps dealing primarily with procedural concerns that surround the development, operation and maintenance of computerized applications: defining the problem; proposing a target solution; conceptualizing the situation; managing and using the data; managing the users; developing the system; managing the resources; management tools; and determining the factors of success. The first step (defining the problem), is concerned with the users—the stakeholders and counterparts of the ‘system’—and examines ‘why’ the system is being established. The section considers that social and diplomatic skills will be the main tools needed, as there will almost certainly be multiple stakeholders to the system. The second step (proposing a target solution) briefly reviews types of system models that will be needed to undertake a preliminary examination of issues of ‘what’ and ‘who’: this step requires an iterative process with the stakeholders. In step three (conceptualizing the situation), systems analysis techniques are considered in more detail, this time supporting an examination of the emerging system. Here the need for establishing ‘system boundaries’ is important, i.e. what should be computerized and what are the other system components. While there is plenty of literature on systems analysis, these sections do not go into much detail. The next step (managing and using the data) is the critical component of any system. Here an overview of an example monitoring information system (for the environment) is presented, showing the main components from data collection, through processing to end use: the initiation of measures to redress problems identified through the system. Consideration is given to means of collection, storage, access and dissemination and some space is devoted to considering what the data could be used for, as well as its interpretation and analysis. Step 5 (managing the users) returns to the beneficiaries of the system. The multiple stakeholders to a monitoring information system and the need for coordination of different parts of the system are considered. Step 6 (developing the system) briefly looks at the preparation of system specifications, prototyping and application development. Step 7 (managing the resources) returns to another key topic, namely managing the resources that will be needed to run an information system, especially the human resources/skills and the financial resources. Management of the system is also the topic of step 8 (management tools), in this case briefly looking at tools for project management, monitoring and analysis. Step 9 (determining the factors of success) wraps up the methodology by presenting some thoughts and questions that may be useful when reviewing the success or failure of the information system. The contextual setting for the methodology is the growing body of literature on our ‘knowledge-based’ and networked society for which monitoring of social and environmental phenomena is of increasing importance. The methodology was tested in fieldwork undertaken primarily in China with some additional inputs from related studies for Mauritius, the Philippines and Thailand. The results of these studies are contained in the ‘case study’ and Annexes of the thesis.
Citation count*4 (2015-07-23)

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