Short-term impact of PM2.5, PM10, and PMc on mortality and morbidity in the agglomeration of Warsaw, Poland

Katarzyna Maciejewska

Abstract

The work presents the results of short-term health effects assessment of particulate matter (PM) in Warsaw, the capital of Poland. The influence of three PM fractions, PM10 (particles of aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm), PM2.5 (particles of aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm), and PMc (coarse fraction of diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm), modeled by the CALMET/CALPUFF system, has been studied in the period of 2013–2014. Six population health endpoints; daily counts of all-cause (ALL), cardiovascular (CV), and respiratory (RS) death cases; and ALL, CV, and RS hospital admissions were investigated with the use of statistical time series analysis via nonparametric generalized additive model (GAM) approach. The results show that PM2.5 increases the relative risk (RR) of ALL premature deaths by 0.7% per 10 μg/m3, as well as of CV mortality by 0.9%. PM10 exposures reveal the largest influence on mortality in a 2-day lag: 0.3% for all causes and 0.4% for CV causes, while for RS causes only in the elderly group (above 65 years, 1.4%) and for males (2.1%). The risk of hospitalizations increases with elevated PMc levels by 2.5%, 2.1%, and 4.6% for ALL, CV, and RS hospital admissions, respectively. The results suggest that the research on PM impact on health should concentrate more on attempts to assign specific health outcomes to PM originating from different types of sources, characterized by different granulation, as well as physical and chemical properties of emitted particles.
Author Katarzyna Maciejewska (FEE / CEP)
Katarzyna Maciejewska,,
- Chair of Environmental Protection
Journal seriesAir Quality Atmosphere and Health, [Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health], ISSN 1873-9318, e-ISSN 1873-9326
Issue year2020
Vol13
No6
Pages659-672
Keywords in Polish Cząstki stałe, śmiertelność, badanie szeregów czasowych, krótkoterminowy wpływ na zdrowie
Keywords in EnglishParticulate matter, Mortality, Hospital admissions, CALPUFF, Time series study, Short-term health impact
ASJC Classification1902 Atmospheric Science; 2307 Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis; 2308 Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law; 2310 Pollution
Abstract in original languageThe work presents the results of short-term health effects assessment of particulate matter (PM) in Warsaw, the capital of Poland. The influence of three PM fractions, PM10 (particles of aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm), PM2.5 (particles of aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm), and PMc (coarse fraction of diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm), modeled by the CALMET/CALPUFF system, has been studied in the period of 2013–2014. Six population health endpoints; daily counts of all-cause (ALL), cardiovascular (CV), and respiratory (RS) death cases; and ALL, CV, and RS hospital admissions were investigated with the use of statistical time series analysis via nonparametric generalized additive model (GAM) approach. The results show that PM2.5 increases the relative risk (RR) of ALL premature deaths by 0.7% per 10 μg/m3, as well as of CV mortality by 0.9%. PM10 exposures reveal the largest influence on mortality in a 2-day lag: 0.3% for all causes and 0.4% for CV causes, while for RS causes only in the elderly group (above 65 years, 1.4%) and for males (2.1%). The risk of hospitalizations increases with elevated PMc levels by 2.5%, 2.1%, and 4.6% for ALL, CV, and RS hospital admissions, respectively. The results suggest that the research on PM impact on health should concentrate more on attempts to assign specific health outcomes to PM originating from different types of sources, characterized by different granulation, as well as physical and chemical properties of emitted particles.
DOIDOI:10.1007/s11869-020-00831-9
URL http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11869-020-00831-9
Languageen angielski
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Maciejewska2020_Article_Short.pdf 1.06 MB
Score (nominal)70
Score sourcejournalList
ScoreMinisterial score = 70.0, 01-07-2020, ArticleFromJournal
Publication indicators Scopus Citations = 0; Scopus SNIP (Source Normalised Impact per Paper): 2018 = 1.081; WoS Impact Factor: 2018 = 2.297 (2) - 2018=2.847 (5)
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